International Business – Degree Study Programs

It is no surprise that businesses are crossing over into other countries by selling their product internationally. The challenge of conducting business internationally is the differences in policy and social interaction. The need for education in business is essential and students can enter degrees with an international focus from business schools across the country.

With companies expanding their reach into foreign markets the study of business in regards to international work is required.

Students can enter multiple degree programs that focus on the differences of business culturally, geographically, and economically.
Studies can be entered at all degree levels, which present students with a variety of careers that they can transition into once they graduate.

There are numerous things for students to know prior to enrollment in a learning program.

1. Beginning education with an associate’s degree provides students with specialized international business courses, general business courses, and some general education courses. The ultimate goal is to train students to enter work in global firms. Students explore global industry standards and regulations that help them become comfortable with international business tactics. Through the examination of business roles in global agenda students become an asset inside their job. Students are taught how to facilitate strategies that center on helping businesses be strong internationally. A general international business course introduces students to the geography, the Internet, and the cultures that participate in global business. Subjects covered include organizations, monetary systems, and business roles. Education at this level is a good stepping-stone to start a career or continue education.

2. Students can study in concentrated areas such as international banking, exporting, and marketing when they enter a bachelor’s degree program. A program goes through the different regulatory practices that make up the work involved in international organizations. Essentials of business are also taught, which includes microeconomics, data analysis, and accounting. Courses on international marketing, finance, transportation, and the global market build upon basic business principles to create a well rounded professional. A marketing course gives students the framework for how marketing crosses national borders. Different foreign markets are examined to prepare students to work with various factors when deciding how to market internationally. Many students enter a career directly after completion but some use a bachelor’s for an education base to enter a master of business administration degree.

3. Management level skills are gained when students work through an MBA in international business. Areas like business risk, foreign interaction, and contract assessment are discussed inside advanced level coursework. Students are able to explain regulations on importing, unfair trade, and law. Management courses on marketing, finance, advertising, and leadership are taught from an international strategic standpoint. Career work can be done in global companies as well as in government agencies and banking companies. Many students work within international companies throughout different areas of the world. In depth research and understanding is obtained when students work through a PhD degree. Curriculum is highly focused on advanced international study. Career work usually consists of becoming a post secondary professor.

International Business Degree Schools Online

Online schooling options are available to students looking to obtain a degree in international business. There are numerous schools and colleges that offer online degree training in the field of business. Students can prepare for the career of their dreams by enrolling in a number of programs. Online schools and colleges allow students to train for careers working in international finance, management, marketing, sales, importing and exporting, and more. Student may study coursework such as foreign culture, economics, imports and exports, tax, and much more depending on the chosen level of degree and specialization. Online degrees in international business can include an associate’s, bachelors, masters, and doctorate degree.

Associates degree programs are available from numerous online schools and colleges. Students can obtain an associates degree in international business in as little as two years depending on the specific area of concentration they choose. Coursework may consist of studying international trade, macroeconomics, global markets, international marketing, and other related courses. Students who wish to enroll in an accredited online program can train for careers with banks, multinational manufacturers, import/export corporations, consulting firms, and other international organizations. With an accredited associates degree students will have the skills and knowledge to pursue a bachelor’s degree in the field.

There are a number of accredited online educational programs that allow students to train for numerous careers in international business. An online bachelor’s degree program will take students approximately four years to complete. Course curriculum will vary depending on the specialization chosen by the students but may include the study of economics, principals of marketing, foreign language, international business finance, cross cultural studies, and much more. Students who wish to pursue international careers such as management analyst, sales representative, auditor, and accountant, should consider a bachelors degree. Those who wish to further their education can consider online degree training for a master’s degree in international business.

Online schools and colleges allow students to enroll in masters degree programs in the area of international business. Online degrees at this level typically take students two additional years to obtain. Students can choose to specialize in a specific area including international trade, tax, management, and much more. Areas of study may include international business policy, trade controls, international finance, foreign operations, and more depending on the chosen specialty. With an accredited masters degree students can pursue careers as international marketing directors, multinational managers, international trade managers, financial controllers, and international foreign policy advisors. A degree at this level of education will allow student to enter the workforce or enroll in a doctorate program.

A doctorate degree in international business will allow students to earn their degree with an additional two years of study. Online educational programs train students in a number of subjects to ensure they receive the knowledge and skills to pursue the career they desire. Coursework may include theory of international business, research design, marketing, communications, multi-national enterprise, and much more. With an accredited online education students will obtain the necessary training to find employment as economic researchers, university professors, business development managers, chief executive officers, and other professionals. A doctorate degree is the highest level of degree obtainable in the field of international business.

The Advantages of MBA International Business Management Online

Advancements in the fields of communication and technology, as well as international travel, have shrunk this planet substantially. These developments have created many potential business opportunities for companies around the globe. The opening of nations’ economy and lowering of international trade tariffs has increased the volume of world-wide business substantially. Therefore, a degree in international business is a wise move for career growth.

Career in Global business navigates through complex global economic landscapes. In an online MBA program specializing in international business, international finances, accounting, management, business policies, and marketing strategies will be covered. Earning an MBA makes you more competitive in the job market, with the potential for high-level promotion.

This Online MBA prepares potential students for business climates around the world. Some Online MBA International Business degree programs can be completed in just months. Gaining this MBA Business degree program prepares students for professions in the global arena, focusing on the challenges that confront international and global markets.

This MBA will address such subjects as analysis of international trade and finance, global marketing strategies, management practices in the international market places, which further enhance studies for a well-rounded MBA in Intl. Business degree. Students acquiring this MBA Degree will be prepared as professionals with opportunities in many professions, such as international sales, global distribution, international management, and international trade. Some of these MBA can be obtained through distance learning offered by reputable university/college.

Online PhD Business Administration master degree programs are also available. Coursework focuses on issues of shifting outlooks for international business, international trade and business, international finance, international economics, as well as other considerations relating to Multi-region international business beyond the United States of America: Singapore, India, China, Japan.

Global business is integral to the success and sustainability of many companies across the nation. As such, it’s imperative that these companies hire candidates with massive international business expertise. The job outlook for careers in international business is highly positive as the global interaction between multi-national companies continues to increase.

If you’ve always had excellent communication skills, have great desire to learn more about other cultures, are business-minded, consider how online universities can help you achieve your MBA degree.

International Business Organization Development Factors For Consideration

International Business Organization

Export/International business can take on many challenges as it unfolds. Goal should be to construct the company’s strategic building blocks, using it’s assets to support international opportunities. The outline is formatted from a more basic approach, increasing through stages of complexity. There will be points below that overlap and dovetail. Some corporations may have already touched on many of these points. The examples below are geared toward the food/protein industries. Nevertheless, the concepts are transferable to many others. Below are organizational ideas for consideration:

I. International Business Unit Establishment- Create P&L.
A. Budget to encompass 3-5 key trade shows and conferences that support the geographic strategy.

– Restaurant Chain Shows (Subway, McDonalds, etc.)- Important shows that demonstrate a company’s willingness to globally expand with the chains.

– Distributor Shows.

– Trade organization conferences. Provide key insights to new emerging markets and trends i.e., USMEF, USDEC, etc.

B. Forecasting- By product category and market to determine business profitability.

C. Expenses- Identify expenses against the business. Be fiscally prudent.

II. Geography- Are the most immediate markets being efficiently addressed by export? Begin with the immediate opportunities i.e., target nearest or import friendly international geographic markets.

A. Canada-

B. Mexico-

C. Caribbean-

D. Domestic Exporters-

III. Export Product Portfolio- Product’s export potential? What are the popular US items sold? Using meat products as an example:

A. Pork- More than likely highest export potential.

B. Poultry- Certain drawbacks (Avian viruses), but often has the necessary price points for market entry.

C. Beef- Still questionable into many overseas markets (BSE). Slowly improving.

D. Other- Veal and lamb offer the specialty items often sought in many of the smaller boutique markets i.e., Caribbean. Should be a high margin opportunity?

IV. Utilize and maximize current customer base. Grow internationally with domestic customers.

A. Chains- What chains are currently being serviced (i.e., McDonalds)? What are the int’l springboard applications of those chains?

B. Distributors- GFS,US :: GFS, Canada; Sysco, US :: Sysco, Canada…Sysco, Export
C. Schools- Offer products supplied to the US to Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and Guam have same requirements.

D. Retail.

V. Expand Geography- Be first in emerging markets. Chains, trade organizations and trade shows will assist in breaking into new venues.

A. Australia, open to US pork imports. US plants must be Australian approved.

B. Brazil and Argentina- as economies improve, so should pork imports.

C. Middle East- Israel.

D. Asia- SE Asia, Latin America.

VI. Product adaptation-

A. A commitment to international product customization. Overcome import non-tariff barriers through product modification.

B. As point “A” is evaluated, determine volumes and pricing with the customer completing the value proposition.

C. New protein introduction- Growing US Hispanic community looking to satisfy traditional diets i.e., goat. US ranchers begin to emerge from their traditional ranching habits to fill a consumer need. Shift creates new export opportunities.

D. Profit Margin/Revenue Growth- Theoretically, there is no competition for custom production and margins should reflect business value.

VII. Resource utilization-

A. R&D efforts to meet a qualified opportunity. Example, a 51% breaded product can be exported to Canada vs. a product with less than 50% breading.

B. Account Managers- Joint calls on corporate to further support the chains international expansions.

Distributor Managers- Joint calls in evaluating immediate opportunities extending across borders.
C. School Managers- Joint calls in US territories to expand and maximize product presence.

VIII. International Partnership Arrangements. Partnering/Joint Ventures with like businesses overseas. Some ideal targets are Japan, Australia, Mexico, China. Key defining terms…product novelty, business profitability, uniqueness, pricing, product demand, market distribution, language understanding, product understanding. If there is a commitment from an overseas manufacturer who understands the product/species, but lacks certain manufacturing capabilities, a partnership should be suggested.

A. Responsibility considerations :

o Raw Material Hedge

o Currency Hedge

o Brokerage Agreement

o Time lines

o Production Capacity

o Legal contract/Export Insurance

B. Partner’s Responsibilities:

o Volume Projections

o Co-Pack Agreement

o QA Plant Approval

o End User Presentations

o Stand-by Letter of Credit/Purchasing Contract

o Exclusivity

o Currency Hedge

o Other product opportunities

Notice currency hedge may fall under both and is open for negotiation. It depends on relationship’s strength. Many times it should be for the account of the partner. An exception may be made to consummate the deal, or as a long term service insuring a yearly contract renewal.

IX. Licensing- Often used as a barometer in evaluating potential opportunities and minimizing immediate risks.

A. Brand Licensing- What is the true value of a certain brand in an international market? Would be determined by the partner company in that country.

Example. What was the value of the Parkay brand in Canada? Became the second best Canadian margarine brand. Produced by Parmalat in Canada. Brand was licensed by ConAgra US.

B. Technology- Minimizes capital overseas investment, while transferring US production technology.

X. Mergers and Acquisitions- Up to this point a corporation may be supplying and evaluating their export potential. Simultaneously, it should be considering the business worthiness of certain key markets. Ultimately, it may consider investment in those markets.

A. Partnership/JV company may be ripe for buy-out.

B. Margin potential internationally warrants an acquisition for corporate diversification purposes.
C. Many similarities i.e., language, business culture, profitability, increased product demand from growing middle class, business supporting political environment.

D. Overcome stringent food import barriers i.e., EEC. Example- Companies have improved international exposure, opening manufacturing plants within the EEC. An example has been the recent purchase of Sara Lee European brands by Smithfield.

XI. Summary- These idea compilations are based on 20 years of international business experiences with four major corporations and an MA in International Business. No one size fits all. The outline can be used to build new profitable opportunities that may not otherwise have been realized or fully exploited.

RICHARD J. PORWIT has been an International Sales and Business Director with extensive food and CPG experience, including new product development, market growth, profit and loss accountability in retail, food service and business to business markets. Consistently known for exceeding set goals, division turn arounds, with cross-functional team leadership in customized product development. Recognized for ability to establish and expand international markets in Asia, Latin America/Caribbean, and the Middle East.

International Business Success

There is a lot of talk today about being “global”. What does global mean? A person of the world? Every country is as different. So is every locality and city or town. The skills a business person needs to be successful in international business go beyond being global. While not comprehensive, this list based on over a dozen years of international business experience should help.


For the international business person, travel is a way of life. Long distance air travel can be especially brutal. The best advice is to arrive one day before any important meetings or conferences to adjust to any time difference. In the air, eat, sleep, work and read but do all in moderation. Air travel gluttony is common among international travelers. The on thing you cannot do is exercise on an airplane.


Stay where your host, whether a local office or a client recommends. While cost is a consideration, so is safety, convenience to meeting locations and services provided. This is the home away from home so chose it with care.


Eat in moderation. Business travel is not the time to make up for every diet that one has ever been one. There is the temptation to eat more than usual. On the other had, when with people who live locally, whether colleagues or clients, ask what they recommend when dining together. Apart from allergies, one should be open to eating local cuisine.


Some cultures drink more than Americans. Some drink less. And some not at all. The best advice is to drink in moderation or not at all. Similar to eating, international business travel is not the time to beat ones college drinking record. It is not healthy and it is insulting to clients and colleagues.


Most American business people, even after the business casual trend, still dress much more casually than business people internationally. Find out from local colleagues or even clients what attire is appropriate. If you do not know, dress in traditional business attire (suits for men and for women). This can always be dressed down if appropriate. Dress like you mean business but more importantly, dress appropriately. The same applies to evening dinners and functions outside of business hours.


Be at meeting early. Do not leave until the meeting is over. Even if others leave to take calls, do not do so except at scheduled breaks. Eat in moderation if lunch is brought in. Do not drink too much coffee but bottled water is good. Clean up after yourself after the meeting. And do not sit in the meeting with your laptop and read your email. That is rude. Do make sure you bring plenty of business cards. Introduce yourself to everybody. Do not interrupt, raise your voice or swear. If you have other calls, schedule them for the evening when not meeting with the clients or your colleagues.


In the evenings it is common to have dinner with clients or colleagues. After dinner is often a time to relax, exercise and catch up on some work before the next day. If staying over a weekend or taking a day off, visit local historical sites, museums, cultural events and also shops and restaurants. Staying in the hotel doing work is not healthy and it does not make one more internationally-minded or cultured.


Find out how your clients and colleagues prefer to communicate when not face-to-face. E-mail is common today. Conference calls are important too. Video conference calls can be very effective. Snail mail and faxes are less and less common today but are still necessary from time-to-time. Keep all communications clear, crisp and to the point. On international conference calls, listen more than talk. And do not interrupt. Ever. Take notes or minutes and make sure they are distributed within one business day of the call. Never e-mail jokes, gags, anything obscene or off-color. Do not swear or raise your voice on calls or video calls. Listening and patience are valued in most non-US cultures.


While most non-US business people speak 2-4 languages most from the US speak 1 or perhaps 2 and not well. To this end, speak clearly in English. Be patient if asked to repeat or explain. This is especially true on conference calls. It is acceptable to pick up local words or phrases. Make sure they are appropriate and that they are pronounced flawlessly. Do not make a joke out of local words or phrases. This is insulting to clients and local colleagues.

While business has a lot to do with finance, technology, human resources, research and development and law, it has more to do with people than anything else. To that end, doing business internationally is about people. By traveling and working with dignity and respect for customers and local colleagues, one is taking the first step toward the extensive skills needed to be successful in international business.

International Business Etiquette

To have respect for ourselves guides our morals; and to have a deference for others governs our manners.” Lawrence Sterne, Irish novelist & satirist (1713 – 1768)

Etiquette, or good manners, is an important part of our day to day lives. Whether we realise it or not we are always subconsciously adhering to rules of etiquette. Much of the time these are unwritten; for example giving up your seat to a lady or elderly person, queuing for a bus in an orderly fashion according to who arrived first or simply saying “please” or “thank you”. All are examples of etiquette; complex unwritten rules that reflect a culture’s values.

Etiquette accomplishes many tasks. However, the one noteworthy function that etiquette does perform is that it shows respect and deference to another. By doing so it maintains good interpersonal relationships. Ultimately, it could be argued, etiquette is about making sure that when people mix together there are rules of interaction in place that ensure their communication, transaction or whatever it may be goes smoothly.

We all now how we or others feel when a lack of etiquette is shown. If someone jumps the queue, does not thank you for holding the door open for them or forgets to shake your hand, we naturally feel disrespected and perturbed.

International Business Etiquette

Keeping the above points in mind, now consider the complexities of working on the international stage. Modern business is global and demands people travel to foreign countries and mix with foreign clients, colleagues or customers. Each one of those cultures will also have their own etiquette rules, many of them unwritten. When two or more different cultures mix, it is easy for small etiquette mistakes to be made that could have negative consequences. Just as you may have felt annoyed when a foreign businessman did not shake your hands upon greeting you, imagine how your Chinese client must have felt when you wrote on his business card or your Indian colleague reacted when you flatly rejected an offer of a meal. Sometimes, not understanding the etiquette of another culture means you show a lack of manners and as Lawrence Sterne said, a lack of deference. This can and does lead to soured relationships, lost deals and in the end poor business results. Anyone working on the international stage needs to understand international business etiquette.

International business etiquette manifests in many shapes and sizes. Throughout the world people from different cultures have varying etiquette rules around areas such as personal space, communication, gift giving, food, business meetings and much more. For those wanting to make a good impression and understanding of international business etiquette is crucial. By way of introducing some of the key areas within international business etiquette we shall look at the following common areas…

Business Card Etiquette:

When you exchange business cards (even if you exchange them) do you simply pass it over and forget about it? In many countries the business card has certain etiquette rules. For example in the Arab world you would never give or receive a business card with your left hand. In China and Japan you should try and use both hands to give and receive. In addition it is always good etiquette to examine the card and make a positive comment on it. Whereas in the UK it may be OK to sling the business card into a pocket, in many countries you should always treat it with much more respect such as storing it in a business card holder.

The Etiquette of Personal Space:

How close do you stand to people? Is it impolite to touch somebody? What about gender differences? In the Middle East you may get very touchy-feely with the men, yet one should never touch a woman. A slap on the back may be OK in Mexico but in China it is a serious no-no. Touch someone on the head in Thailand or Indonesia and you would have caused great insult. Without an appreciation of international business etiquette, these things would never be known.

The Etiquette of Gift Giving:

Many countries such as China and Japan have many etiquette rules surrounding the exchange of business gifts. International business etiquette allows you an insight into what to buy, how to give a gift, how to receive, whether to open in front of the giver and what gifts not to buy. Great examples of gifts to avoid are anything alcoholic in Muslim countries, anything with four of anything in Japan and clocks in China.

The Etiquette of Communication:

Some cultures like to talk loudly (US and Germany), some softly (India and China); some speak directly (Holland and Denmark) others indirectly (UK and Japan); some tolerate interrupting others while speaking (Brazil) others not (Canada); some are very blunt (Greece) and some very flowery (Middle East). All will believe the way they are communicating is fine, but when transferred into an international context this no longer applies. Without the right international business etiquette it is easy to offend.

By way of conclusion we can state that etiquette helps maintain good relations with people. When dealing with people from a shared culture, everyone knows the rules and there is not much to think about. Those that lack etiquette are branded as uncouth and rude. However, this is not the same when working on the international stage. Someone may very well come across as being rude through a lack of etiquette but this may be because in their culture that behaviour is normal. As a result international business etiquette is a key skill for those wanting to be successful when working abroad. Through a great appreciation and understanding of others’ cultures you build stronger and longer lasting business relationships.